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She’s Having a Baby and the MEMORIES OF HER Moment

The One-Line Summary: Despite protests from his best friend, Jake Briggs (Kevin Bacon) marries his sweetheart Kristy (Elizabeth McGovern) and move to the suburbs and try to cope with the realties of being adults, the pressures of their parents, and having a baby in this John Hughes comedy/drama that mixes some fun fantasy sequences with surprising emotional moments.

Paramount Pictures
Paramount Pictures

The Two-Line Blurb: More Jake’s story than Kristy’s, the film focuses on his adjustment from the wild care-free life of a single man, partying with his best friend Davis (Alec Baldwin) to the domesticated setting of a marriage he doesn’t quite feel fully a part of. This leads to insecurities and sexual fantasies with another women, but reveals a good man who knows his destiny lies in the arms of a the mother of his future child.

Shes-Having-A-Baby-DI
Paramount Pictures

The Three-Line Set-up: As the young couple maneuver through the delicate early stages of their marriage, they encounter a slew of predicable hurdles, but it is her inability to become pregnant that becomes the focus as Jake, once told it is partially his fault they can’t conceive must learn to make a few changes. Sex becomes scientific, with time and special apparatus making the act if not comical, downright methodical. Eventually though, they succeed and when the time comes, there is a dangerous complication and Kirsty is rushed to surgery, leaving Jake and the parents alone in the waiting room.

Paramount Pictures
Paramount Pictures

The Four-Line Moment: Hughes knows a thing or two about coaxing emotions, and the sudden shift to drama is very effective. A dialogue-free moment, we watch as Jake sits separated from the other, in tears, flashing back to memories of Kristy and him fixing up the house and sharing good times. On the soundtrack is English singer-songwriter Kate Bush performing a song written especially for this moment, telling the story from a man’s point of view. It’s strikingly poignant, and is one of the more powerful sequences in all of Hughes’ filmography.

The Five-Word Review: Watch the end credits for cameos.

Clip courtesy Movieclips

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Director:

John Hughes

Writer:

John Hughes

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7 Comments

  1. vinnieh August 5, 2015
    • David August 5, 2015
      • vinnieh August 5, 2015
        • David August 5, 2015
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  2. table9mutant August 7, 2015
    • David August 7, 2015